volume 16 issue 1

The Lead

In this week's lead story, Sarina Bhandari interviews students who have taken leaves of absence, examining the complications—academic, social, and financial—that can result from a voluntary or involuntary leave of absence.

Interview

As president of Barnard College, Debora Spar has a lot on her plate. Last year, she released a book, Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection, that explores one of the unintended consequences feminist movements have created for the 21st century woman.

Humor

Dear Grammys,

      I want to hold it in, but I can’t any longer; I just can’t. I love you.

      I had been made so bitter and hurt by your liaisons with Steely Dan, Natalie Cole, and Herbie Hancock—that I had to leave you for Madame Pitchfork.

The Eye

When we were kids, we were lucky if the teenager from across the street was willing to turn off the TV long enough to read us a bedtime story.

In the first ever episode of Mad Men, Don Draper tries to sell a cigarette with the cheery claim that “it’s toasted.” Of course, the show’s creators can safely assume we know enough about the dangers of cigarettes to catch the irony.

When I was little, my mom was the kind who always offered to talk about “my changing body.” Those three words still remain the most cringe-inducing in my repertoire, even almost 10 years later.

I cannot claim to be a trendsetter. I’d never heard of Mumford & Sons until about a year ago, and I just got a Twitter. My friends have long been concerned about my lack of cultural awareness and have staged various interventions.

Elle Magazine recently published a Women in Television issue that ran with four alternate covers, featuring Zooey Deschanel of New Girl, Allison Williams of Girls, Amy Poehler of Parks and Recreation, and Mindy Kaling of The Mindy Project.

When’s the last time you sent your team to the Super Bowl? Yes, the Super Bowl, America’s favorite sporting event. Very few people can affirm this statement, and Richard Sherman is one of them.

 “So you wanna quit,” mom said. “You wanna drop out. Move home.” I looked down at my hands, picked up my fork, and pushed the Thanksgiving leftovers around my plate. The yellow light encircling the dining table in an otherwise dark house made me feel like I was in an interrogation room.