Opinion | Op-eds

Athletes deserve respect

When I first decided to respond to the article “The Dodge Divide” in The Eye, I thought about making myself anonymous. I figured I could say whatever I pleased in this response—be as vulgar and angry as I wanted to be—and no one would be able to trace it back to me. But I decided not to do this. My name is Chad Washington, and I am currently a sophomore on the football team, for which I play defensive end. I am a declared political science and statistics major. I have a 3.03 GPA after three semesters at Columbia, and I am currently enrolled in four classes.

There is a certain passion that comes with playing a sport—a will inside of that athlete that drives him or her to become the best that athlete possible in order to win. Similar to what the baseball player said in the article, I won’t stop playing football until someone tells me to hang up my helmet and pads and go home. Being a football player since middle school has definitely shaped me into the man I am today. It taught me discipline, gave me a tireless work ethic, and helped me learn new things at a relatively fast rate. It also aided my acceptance into one of the top five colleges in the world, and I am so thankful for that.

But at Columbia, teachers and professors are quick to judge and criticize athletes because they have never been athletes themselves. I marvel at Nathan Pilkington, the Lit Hum instructor who insisted that Columbia athletes are not Division I athletes and are on some sort of lower stage. I looked him up: B.A. with highest honors from UNC-Chapel Hill, master’s from, of course, Columbia in history. It sounds like Nathan was almost made to be at Columbia. I’m guessing he does not share my passion for athletics, and that’s not a bad thing. But I would never question his accolades and achievements as a student. He has no right to question the authenticity of a Division I program. Columbia is a member of the Ivy League conference, and has one of the oldest NCAA football and athletic programs in the history of college sports. We play Division I football with Division I responsibilities, coaches, and competition. I speak for all athletes when I say this: Do not question our authenticity of our status until you take the time to immerse yourself in the athletics of Columbia.

It was interesting to me that the editors decided to title the article “The Dodge Divide.” Unless I pick a class I know my fellow teammates will be in, chances are I am one of two or maybe three athletes in a class. But like basketball player Cory Osetkowski said in the article, everyone at Columbia is here to get an education. We are all Lions who are striving after the same goals: to earn a degree and make our parents and families proud. My parents taught me that this is something that requires both success in the classroom and on the field, and standards were always pretty high in my household. That is what fueled me to take on Columbia as a challenge in my life.

I know I am viewed as an athlete first on this campus. Physically I look the part, and I often introduce myself as a football player. Yet as soon as I begin to mention my studies and the degree I am pursuing, people question my intelligence and seem to doubt my abilities as a student. Athlete is not a good category to be in. At Columbia the main problem is that instead of athletes being praised and respected for their ability to achieve more than the average student by keeping up with academics and athletics at the same time, they are seen as less than the average student.

Most of my fellow students at Columbia feel so divided from athletes because, once again, sports have never been a part of their life. During Friday nights in high school, they were probably in the library and not at the football game. During the Homecoming pep rally, future Columbia students were most likely working on extra homework and problem sets. There is nothing wrong with making those choices. But by doing so, these students are distancing themselves from a huge and important part of life. The problem doesn’t lie with the athletes, but instead the students who surround them. In Contemporary Civilization, we learn about the tyranny of the majority. As only 13 percent of all Columbia students, athletes are clearly in the minority. Columbia is nothing like a democracy, but at the same time, opinions reflect the manners of the majority.

In order for the lifestyle at Columbia to change, Columbia must change. The least Columbia students can do is engage in athletic events. Basketball Mania has been successful the past two years, but that’s just the beginning. Maybe we should think about incorporating a Homecoming rally during the week before the Homecoming football game. Maybe we should set up a portion of NSOP where Columbia students are able to sit down with an athlete and ask them questions about what it means to play a sport in the Ivy League. Columbia student-athletes, and all Ivy League athletes, should be praised for their performance. The fact that Columbia athletes are able not only to excel and grow in their sports but also to pass classes consistently and make it through the curriculum of an Ivy league school is an incredible achievement.

The author is a Columbia College sophomore majoring in political science and statistics. He is a member of the varsity football team.

To respond to this op-ed, or to submit an op-ed, contact opinion@columbiaspectator.com

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Alexander posted on

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Columbia-Football-Player-Arrest-Asian-Harassment-206469211.html

You do not deserve respect. Respect is earned, not given.

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Amateur historian posted on

Spec, you desperately need to get the comments that disappeared with the site refresh back up. Lost a wealth of contemporary commentary on this op-ed and other articles that could put newer stories into perspective...to wit...^

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Anonymous posted on

"I figured I could say whatever I pleased in this response—be as vulgar and angry as I wanted to be—and no one would be able to trace it back to me." Had a bit of trouble the other day didn't we?

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Hannah posted on

"Most of my fellow students at Columbia feel so divided from athletes because, once again, sports have never been a part of their life. During Friday nights in high school, they were probably in the library and not at the football game. During the Homecoming pep rally, future Columbia students were most likely working on extra homework and problem sets. There is nothing wrong with making those choices."

Is this true at all? I can tell you I was at every Friday night football game in HS. "Maybe if you sat down with a non-athlete and asked them about their experience..."

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blame yourself, not the school and students posted on

If Chad Washington wanted to attend an athlete-worship school, Chad Washington should have matriculated at an athlete-worship school. But he didn't. He chose Columbia University, knowing fully well that it focuses on academics rather than athletics. And then he complains about the university, professors, and fellow students who don't really care about athletes. And then he commits hate crimes. Wow.

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irony posted on

Did anyone else notice that ALL of the comments to this article were posted AFTER the author Chad Washington was accused a hate crime against an Asian student? It's almost amusing to imagine that the writer committed the hate crime to drive traffic here and bring attention to the "plight" of athletes at the school. The article on its own, sans crime, was pretty much ignored.

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opinion posted on

There were actually a number of comments, and we're still trying to import them over from the old site.

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Anonymous posted on

You make several claims that are very much so unfounded in your article, and many of them exhibit what is WRONG with the Columbia Athletic program. You attempt to enforce a notion of reconciliation between two parties: The academics and the athletes here at Columbia. Yes, we are on two opposite sides of a spectrum, and to metaphorically put it, there is a bridge dividing us. But, do not expect one of us to cross over the bridge entirely. The issue here is a lack of recognition of efforts on both sides.

But let me go on. You are despicable. "I speak for all athletes when I say this: Do not question our authenticity of our status until you take the time to immerse yourself in the athletics of Columbia." Well, thats all fine and dandy, but I think I speak for all Columbia students who are here for the academics it promises when saying "Do not question the authenticity of our status until you take the time to immerse yourself in the academics of Columbia." Maybe you all should try coming to the library on a Friday night, and we will go to an athletic event?

Your generalizations of the academic body are also disgusting too: you effectively identify Columbia as athletes and non athletes, but there is so much more. We have dancers, we have musicians, debaters, writers, actors/actresses, playwrights. Maybe instead of identifying against all of this characteristics, you should identify with some of them. Find commonalities and not differences.

Both sides need to focus on reconciliation, one side cannot do all the work. Referring back to the metaphorical bridge dividing us, yes, I am ready to cross it, but you must be too. I will not, nor should I be required to, walk the whole distance.

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Anonymous posted on

Well, you've probably tarnished the name of the Columbia athletics program even more after what you did last night

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Nerd posted on

I would feel more welcoming of athletes had I not been subjected to their tyranny for twelve years until I escaped to a place where people actually know how to think and gain respect in this way.

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Anonymous posted on

"There is a certain passion that comes with playing a sport—a will inside of that athlete that drives him or her to become the best that athlete possible in order to win."

This is a poorly written article. I mean like grammatically and structurally. Mandatory repeat of UWriting for all football players! I think they need it...

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Anonymous posted on

A certain passion - innate in all athletes - drives me to pursue excellence and win.

How about that?

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Anonymous posted on

Half of your attempted sentences are fragments. This is a typical case of the pot calling the kettle ineloquent.

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Ronald posted on

Oh wait... Asians don't deserve respect?

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Anonymous posted on

Didn't you know? Those ching chong chinks all look the same and can't speak English.
(MASSIVE DISCLAIMER: I AM ASIAN AND WROTE THE ABOVE IN META-RACIST IRONY!!! Please don't hate on me.)

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Anonymous posted on

Who can hate on someone who employs "meta-racist irony"?

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finster posted on

CRIMINAL

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Anonymous posted on

How about, EVERYONE DESERVES RESPECT.

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Anonymous posted on

It is probably because you guys suck why you don't get any respect or praise

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Anonymous posted on

Athletes choose to play a game in addition to real world responsibilities. There is nothing special about this. No respect is deserved for handling the responsibilities you SHOULD be handling in addition to playing a game. If anything, society is screwed up for worshipping athletes and giving them the idea that throwing a ball makes them more special than anyone else.

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Alex posted on

Chad, this article sure as hell is funny now. Yes, and I question your intelligence, not because of a sport you happen to play, but because you. are. you.

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Kenfrombayside posted on

A conservative website brought me here. I did not hear about this in the so called mainstream press. Google the following sites: council of conservative citizens, irateirishman and new nation. These sites bring you news that censored by others. This double standard must end.

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Ray posted on

Maybe you don't get respect because you're a nigger.

http://www.columbiaspectator.com/2013/05/07/nbc-new-york-football-player-charged-hate-crime#comment-12941

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Ethan posted on

Your use of that word makes you look ignorant and hateful Ray. Grow up before you get hurt.

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Lady Edith Coxx posted on

How embarrassing.

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Anonymous posted on

Good for you Chad!- fellow Ivy fb player

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Ethan posted on

You are a disgrace. Chad Washington is a coward. Oh right IVY FB player not SEC where real men play. Ivy = powder puff league

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Ethan Weinstock posted on

6'4 240lbs? Come over to Renzo Gracie Jiu Jitsu in NYC, glove up and let's go a few rounds. ethantrojanfilm@gmail.com

I'm serious but I think you are bit too chicken to fight a man. You play on a joke of football team; pop warner would show up Lions football LMFAO. So if you are worth your salt and affirmative action pass into Columbia, show up, email me and we can set it up. I will break your ankles. I promise. You won't play ball in 2013. But if you are such a big bad tough D-END take me up and save your face homie. I'm sure a real man like Ngata would but you aren't Ngata you are a joke of a human being brought up by even less human parents. There I called out your family, your person, and your school. Stand up, CHAD WASHINGTON don't be scared: ethantrojanfilm@gmail.com

We can do it in the cage, on the mat, or in a phone booth for all I care. I just want to discipline you.

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Ethan Weinstock posted on

WITNESS A REAL COWARD IN CHAD WASHINGTON.

I challenged Mr. Washington to some sparring and all I hear is the wind. Chad Washington can gang up on an unassuming young asian and 2 girls but cowers in fear when a man challenges him. Good thing you play in the IVY league dude. You'd be paralyzed if you competed in the PAC 10 or SEC.

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Mr Isaac posted on

True fighters never talk, they just bring it when they have to. Thus, you are the real coward, posing as a champion. When you get your ass whipped - at it will be whipped soon - it will be by a 'real man' who never said a word. Don't be surprised if I drop by.....

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vessel23 posted on

I'm not going to touch the hate crime subject since it looks like plenty of other comments have that covered.

I want to point out that Chad Washington is generalizing non-athletes... to a huge degree. In his myopic worldview, there are only two kinds of people, athletes and nerds. Dude watches too many movies or something, some of his statements are ridiculous -

"Most of my fellow students at Columbia feel so divided from athletes because, once again, sports have never been a part of their life. During Friday nights in high school, they were probably in the library and not at the football game. During the Homecoming pep rally, future Columbia students were most likely working on extra homework and problem sets."

I'm an Asian American, graduated from Columbia College in '02 and I was neither an athlete or nerd in high school. After school while the football players were at practice, I was probably hanging out with my girlfriend or my friends, playing video games, driving around town, hanging out at the mall. I went to homecoming, homecoming pep rallies every year and prom my junior and senior years. I was friends with a bunch of football players too - friday nights sometimes I would be at the football game, sometimes I would be jamming with some other friends in a sort-of band (me - drums).

I didn't join organized team sports in high school mostly because I was lazy and didn't want every day to be jam-packed with stuff I had to do, but like most guys growing up I was still a big sports fan (unfortunately growing up in the DC area). I also casually played tennis and pick up games of basketball with friends at the local courts.

Just pointing out that I was pretty typical dude in high school. But I was definitely above average academically - I almost never did any school work, skipped classes on the regular (excused - forged moms signature), copied most of my problem sets from friends, but still managed to graduate 10th in a class of 400 with a 4.6/5.0 GPA and a 1600 on my SATs to boot (when it was still out of 1600). Who the hell does "extra" problem sets, Chad? I don't know a single person who has ever done "extra" problem sets before.

Columbia wasn't my first choice and I admittedly half-assed the essay, declined an interview, and still got in. I decided to go after visiting and realizing I would love going to college in Manhattan.

Believe me I'm not tooting my own horn at all. I knew many people much smarter than me in college.. I was definitely a lazy underacheiver type.. this isn't about me. The thing is, I found that my high school experience was fairly common among non-athlete friends and acquaintances I met at Columbia. Many of the non-athletes I met were extremely intelligent and pretty much coasted through high school. I also found them to be pretty well-rounded and social with varied interest ranging from music to video games. I'm not saying there aren't nerds at Columbia, of course there are just in my experience they're not that large of a group and most-non athletes are not nerds.

Also I can't help but laugh at Chad's assertion that the athletes are Columbia achieve more than a non-athlete because they can keep up with athletics and academics at the same time. Not saying there aren't student-athletes that are very smart - I'm sure there are some football players taking 5-6 classes per semester and majoring in Applied Math, but I would guess that those are few and far between.

TL;DR No offense Chad, but there are alot of non-athletes who coasted through high school to Columbia without doing "extra" problem sets. There are also quite a number of genius-level non-athletes that are studying crazy stuff that you can't even compare to the typical football player schedule (and I'm not talking out of my ass, most team athletes I knew at Columbia and other high-ranked universities had joke majors and joke schedules... not all, but like 95% haha.) Alot of the non-athletes you see around campus Chad - they didn't study all that hard to get in, they're just naturally that smart and they probably have more free time than you to go explore Manhattan.

btw I'm still a huge college football fan... but like the rest of the country I only care about D-I

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Anonymous posted on

uh, Ivy League is D-I man

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vessel23 posted on

fine it technically is, but c'mon, everyone knows they compete at a lower level than the rest of D-I conferences in team sports except for rowing

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Anonymous posted on

Why do you hate Asians so much? I assume you would not appreciate people making racist comments to you. Just because you are big,
Does not give you the right to bully others. People like you perpetuate negative stereotypes of black people by your behavior. Don't blame white people next time they act intimidated, blame yourself!

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Anonymous posted on

Why do you hate Asians so much? I assume you would not appreciate people making racist comments to you. Just because you are big,
Does not give you the right to bully others. People like you perpetuate negative stereotypes of black people by your behavior. Don't blame white people next time they act intimidated, blame yourself!

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Chau Lam posted on

You are a stupid monkey! Come down to 275 Canal Street in Chinatown anytime and I will kick your monkey ass back to Africa. It is right next to the Burger King if you can't read. Bring all your monkey ass friends too, we will kick all your monkey asses and send you back to Africa where you belong!

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Anonymous posted on

You totally took Pilkington's quote out of context and very wrongly personally attack him. He actually is just saying that it should be acceptable to let academics take precedence occasionally if you're an athlete. If I were you, I would have gone after Jessamyn Conrad. Now that's a worthy/ easy target.

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Anonymous posted on

Nathan has always been a staunch supporter of athletes, I was really surprised that he'd say something like that. Yeah, so, I'm *not* surprised he didn't say that. I still appreciate Chad's point, as poorly said as it is.

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Anonymous posted on

It seems like Pilkington fails to acknowledge all the times that academics DO take precedence over athletics, and this is something that many professors overlook. of course they notice when a student must miss a one class for a competition, but they don't realize the many times a student will leave practice early to make it to class on time. honestly, i think missing a class or two for competitions is okay, especially while other students deem themselves "sick" when SHM is in town....

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Anonymous posted on

If the football team actually won something we wouldn't care nearly as much about your being here as athletes. Makes us proud and don't spend millions of dollars in vain.

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Anonymous posted on

Before you go making a rude comment about the football team's spending, why don't you actually figure out how much comes from sponsors/alumni. Athletes shouldn't be an issue at all especially when thre are pompous assholes like yourself who comment just to be rude without of checking facts.

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Anonymous posted on

enlighten us about how much comes from sponsors/alumni. last i checked no one was handing out those figures.

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Anonymous posted on

http://givingday.columbia.edu/...

almost $1,000,000 in one day... only second in amount behind Columbia College of which we only are comprised of 13% of those students... there you go. figures. facts.

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Anonymous posted on

1. pretty sure there are also SEAS student athletes

2. $1 million is nothing to this school, what i'd like to know is how much money from all students' tuitions (student life fees anyone?) go towards varsity athletics programs (think buses, apparel, other random crap, apparently fb team gets deliveries of hamdel every day or something) when it means nothing to us.

i'm not talking one very publicized donations game ("giving day"), i'm talkin about overall. i'd like to know how much is going into the program from students vs actually from "sponsors/alumni", and on the flipside, how many "sponsors/alumni" are donating to programs in the school that are not the athletics program because if they're only donating to the athletics program i'd also like to agree with Anonymous above

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Anonymous posted on

Well, that was a coherent sentence.

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Anonymous posted on

I agree with the article in that our athletes should be personally supported. Still, I find the alumni $ defense of the Athletics Department to be upsetting for several reasons. For one thing, just because donors earmark their cash for Athletics (which tends to be more wasteful than some other departments) doesn't mean their money wouldn't have gone elsewhere. But if our Athletics donors ARE only giving to Columbia for this purpose, why even bother indulging them? Does maintaining a toilet of an Athletics Department have anything to do with the purpose of the university? Should Columbia take money to sell cigarette filters, or do unethical DoD research, or set up a propaganda bureau for the Chinese government if they pay enough cash upfront (well, leaving aside the fact that we've done these things)? Donations aren't necessarily a zero-sum game, but I think our poorer and more world-class departments would be richer if athletics spending was heavily curtailed.

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Anonymous posted on

Facts -
1.) Every student is forced to pay for the athletics program, thus we all care about how that money is spent.
http://www.columbiaspectator.c...

"The largest portion of the $1,396 fee—which is set by the central administration each year—is the $390 that goes to the athletic department."

2.) Spending our money on losers drives animosity and disrespect for the athletes. Athletics should be a source of pride we can all count on, instead, it's a source of shame we all suffer from.

http://espn.go.com/college-foo...

Football:
2012: 3-7 (2-5) Losing season
2011: 1-9 (1-6) Losing season
2010: 4-6 (2-5) Losing season
2009: 4-6 (3-4) Losing season
2008: 2-8 (2-5) Losing season
2007: 1-9 (0-7) Losing season
2006: 5-5 (2-5) Losing season*
2005: 2-8 (0-7) Losing season
2004: 1-9 (1-6) Losing season
2003: 4-6 (3-4) Losing season
2002: 1-9 (0-7) Losing season

* the season tied, but conference loss, so I'll consider that to be a losing one too

Football is the focus of the article and the sport referenced above. Some of the other sports win occasionally, but on a whole our school sends out one message loud and clear - our athletics program is a joke.

Athletes deserve no more respect than any other student based on the items Mr. Washington has listed above. Discipline, worth ethic, and learning ability are not unique among your peers. Passion, early mornings, and hard work are not unique either.

I'm not suggesting we should look down upon athletes as being lesser students, or incapable of their studies. Far from it, your academic ability speaks for itself.

BUT, if you want RESPECT for being athletes - YOU HAVE TO EARN IT AS ATHLETES! That means winning. PERIOD. The problem is not with your academics; the problem is with your SHITTY RECORD of constant losing. We don't need an NSOP meet and greet. What we need is for you to put points on the board and win the sports you suck at.

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Anonymous posted on

And one more thing... if you don't want to be identified as an athlete first, then don't tell everyone that's who you are. It would also help if you didn't wear CU-Athletics based clothing to class.

"Physically I look the part, and I often introduce myself as a football player."

The way to fix this problem is not by changing those around you, its by changing yourselves.

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Anonymous posted on

where do you think the money comes from?

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Anonymous posted on

Chad, very well said.

Columbia will never be on the same level as HYP and Stanford until the students at Columbia start looking up to each other. To treat athletes with disdain is to treat your fellow classmates with disdain.

Students at HYPS respect each other. But, Columbia students are so insecure that they have to look down on students in their own classes! Be it internationals, athletes, asians, Barnard students, GS students, the list goes on.

I graduated from the college. I was not an athlete. I attended graduate school at P and H. Students at these schools can't say enough good things about their classmates. They are proud of their fellow students.

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Anonymous posted on

That's a crock. The students at Harvard especially are ultra competitive
and will do anything to screw over their classmates. They are very smart and very evil. they have a worldwide reputation of cheating. Have you seen The Social Network?

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Anonymous posted on

Right - Harvard students will screw their classmates, but not talk down the school. The value of the Harvard brand has as much to do with the students' reverence for it, and not constantly beating it up. Columbia suffers in this regard. Partly because many people come here not for Columbia, but for NYC, or not for Columbia, but for the Ivy League credential (cause they didn't get in to HYP). Too many Columbians don't really want to be at Columbia, and as such, they love tearing it down.

Unfortunate but true. Our admit rate may be outstanding, but our yield doesn't compare with those three.

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Anonymous posted on

That response I will agree with. You will never see an anti HYP article ever written in any of their papers. For better or worse they have tighter control on the media. Harvard tried to hide the recent cheating scandal, but it was leaked to the press. Same with the email censoring recently. But the students in general praise their school, and we need more of that here. Stanford's paper is just news about the university, never a derogatory article.

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Anonymous posted on

Of course part of it has to do with the feeling that they're not trying to screw their students over there. Here, rightly, people feel that they are treated like/considered shit by the administration.

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Anonymous posted on

res ipsa loquitur?

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doink posted on

Correct about Harvard. About Columbia, I have news for you.

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Anonymous posted on

I think there is a case to be made that the Columbia community can do more to support student athletes, but this is not it. I'm sorry, but if your academic bar is to "pass classes consistently" and you feel entitled to more respect than the "average student," then you're not going to get it. Also, not attending pep rallys does not mean that someone is "distancing themselves from a huge and important part of life." These people could have been in the library studying; they could also have been at a concert with friends, at the movies, working a part-time job, spending time with their family, etc. Your basic complaint is that people are making assumptions about you; a good way to make them stop and think about that is to stop making assumptions about them.

Also, not cool calling out your TA; remember, grad students are students too, but part of what they are learning is how to teach and interact with students. I don't know you or Nathan, but including his name in the article does not add anything to your argument.

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Anonymous posted on

Especially if you know Nathan. He's literally the most supportive teacher it's possible to have for athletes and working students, plus he's a former athlete himself who loves sports and thinks it's a shame Columbia isn't as invested in them as his alma mater.

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Anonymous posted on

Way to put yourself out there for everyone in the athletic community. I admire you for all the crap you are going to get for responding to that awful article! Go Lions!

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Anonymous posted on

"During Friday nights in high school, they were probably in the library and not at the football game. During the Homecoming pep rally, future Columbia students were most likely working on extra homework and problem sets. " Yeah, probably! What an assumption. Athletes do deserve more respect on this campus for the tremendous workload that they take on, and, for the most part, successfully balance with classes. But to make such a broad generalization about 87% of students at Columbia is ridiculous. I'd wager there's a large chunk of people that excelled in high school, played multiple sports, did a bunch of extra-curricular shit, and had great social lives. There are also people here who could've played sports at college (or did for a year or two) and decided they didn't like it anymore, and are now killing it in other areas. Athletes don't "achieve more than the average student". We're all achieving in different ways and should all be complimenting each other 24/7. Perhaps I'm too optimistic.

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GarnetHenderson posted on

My thoughts exactly. Maybe there's a case to be made for the fact that student athletes deserve more respect, but to assume that people who don't play on Columbia teams have never been involved in athletics, and therefore just don't get it, is way off base.

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Anonymous posted on

Poli Sci, 3.03, four classes

HAHAHHAHAHAHH

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Anonymous posted on

The kid is up at five am every morning to lift and run. Plus he had the balls to put his name down. Unlike you "Anonymous"

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Anonymous posted on

There's something called clubs, volunteering, clubs, part-time jobs, etc. All which take time and effort. The stress that some of these activities take do in fact make people tired in other ways than just getting up in the morning to lift and run. A lot students stay up all night or wake up really early consistently for other activities as well. Just because athletics take up a lot of your time, does not mean the rest of the students don't have activities take that take up huge amounts of their time.

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Anonymous posted on

But do you have to get up early and participate in all of these clubs and volunteering efforts when you are bogged down with papers and midterms, or do you just text someone saying you can't make it or just simply skip? Athletes cannot take time off to complete schoolwork and continue to work hard at their sport even during the hardest, most stressful weeks of the academic calendar.

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Anonymous posted on

try waking up at 4am everyday and see how well you manage..regular students have all day to do their work but constantly complain about being tired when the most physical activity they have is walking to class..

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Anonymous posted on

Good points, but I feel kind of embarrassed that this was so poorly written.

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Anonymous posted on

Which part was so cringe inducing?
Not enough six syllable words for your liking?

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Anonymous posted on

It's not cringe-inducing, but not particularly good either...not because of a lack of six-syllable words, but because of a poor introduction (typically introducing oneself like that is reserved for high school student council speeches, especially when you have a byline right there), inconsistent support for arguments (sports are said to be a "huge and important part of life" with no explanation, the author childishly accuses other students of being "the problem," etc.), and simplistic solutions that do not display a nuanced understanding of the issue. While I applaud Chad for putting himself out there and writing this piece (this issue is, I think, very important to discuss publicly), this article shows that he too is the victim of a "divided" mindset. Calling for NSOP to be restructured so students will understand the lives of athletes or declaring an apathy for sports a "problem" because it "distances" students from a major part of life demonstrates the author's bias and his inability to see certain other sides of the issue. Not that this is a mortal sin---we all privilege our particular vantage points in matters like these---but it is something the author should be aware of.

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Anonymous posted on

You are very obnoxious. Who would I rather hire at my firm? Let's see, an obnoxious pinhead like you or a guy like Chad?

Keep doing good things Chad. Don't let these over-educated and annoying kids get to you. I think it is very impressive that you play football for the Lions and are able to study at a college like Columbia. Very few people could pull that off! Employers like me look very highly on student athletes at ivies.

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Anonymous posted on

This sentiment, common among employers, is exactly the reason why many students are inwardly resentful (jealous even) of athletes.
They know that a potential employer would, in many if not most cases, rather hire a student-athlete than a regular student even with a slightly higher GPA.

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Anonymous posted on

Sometimes social skills or well roundness is better than a 4.0

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Anonymous posted on

Yeah suuuure. It's well-known. Firms love meatheads. Don't stress about your GPA anymore: big arms are enough.

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Anonymous posted on

Lions fan/former athlete: I completely agree with you. Even if we completely ignore the problems with his rhetoric, there are still several grammatical errors. Expecting a published piece of writing to simply have been proof read is not "over-educated" or "annoying". Alum, if you would hire someone who submitted a resume or cover letter that had not been proof read and contained several grammatical mistakes, then you are definitely in the minority.

That being said, I do admire Chad for putting this out there. We see many op-eds that denounce CU athletics, but very few that come from athletes defending themselves. I think that this is definitely an issue that needs to be discussed and Chad was quite brave to show the other side of the conversation.

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Anonymous posted on

I sure as hell wouldn't want to work with a boss who considers "over-educated" to be a quality one can have, much less an insult. The commenter you're responding to didn't insult Chad; he or she merely pointed out the fallacies and inconsistencies in Chad's argument. Chad mentions the "tyranny of the majority" of John Stuart Mill's "On Liberty." Chad, therefore, must be aware of and appreciate the power that comes from diversity of opinions; no doubt he sees such critical but positive appraisals of his rationalizations to be helpful rather than harmful. You're the one spinning the post and kicking off with an insult.

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Anonymous posted on

Well, with your impeccable critical reading skills you should be able to tell that the whole point of the introductory paragraph was Washington's decision to not respond anonymously to the article in question.
The statements of fact that closed his introduction were meant as emphasis of this, and their spareness was probably intentional.

Your less-than-complete understanding of a piece of writing doesn't make it bad. I actually found it somewhat elegant.

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Anonymous posted on

Whoever removed my reply to this needs to not.

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Anonymous posted on

The football man said bad things about my books and my Lit-Hum teacher. HE'S A WITCH!

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Anonymous posted on

The problem with Chad's argument and others like it is that they don't respond to the question brought up in the first article: "However, this raises the question of why students who devoted their high school lives to equally demanding nonathletic extracurricular pursuits still have to maintain near-perfect GPAs and SAT scores to be competitive in the eyes of admissions officers."

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Anonymous posted on

The problem is not that you play football. That's great and you should be proud of it a you are. The issue is that Columbia lowers its admission standards for athletes. Because of this fact, athletes feel insecure on this campus and people view them differently. this is magnified by the fact that as a result of this atheletes hang out together and move in packs and isolate themselves from the rest of the student body.

I think sports is great but Columbia should not recruit and the teams should be open to walk-ons.

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Anonymous posted on

George, Columbia is in the Ivy League, a div I conference. The funny thing About the non-athleyes who complain about the athletes not being smart enough, is that these non-athletes cherish their ivy league affiliation. But, the ivy league is a div 1 conference. Either Columbia is in the Ivy League or not. You can't have it both ways. No recruiting and only walk-on players means Columbia drops out of the League and is replaced with another college. How would you like that George?

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Anonymous posted on

THE ENTIRE LEAGUE SHOULD GET OUT OF THE SPORTS BUSINESS. AN OPTION FOR COLUMBIA IS TO DROP SPORTS LIKE FEMALE BASKETBALL AND OTHER MINOR SPORTS AND JUST KEEP A COUPLE OF VARSITY SPORTS TO MINIMIZE THE NUMBER OF RECRUITS. ALSO, PERHAPS ALL FEMALE JOCKS SHOULD GO TO BARNARD.

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Anonymous posted on

also, 3.03 is a ind of a crappy GPA and extra-curricular like football should not be an excuse. Don't worry Chad, you'll be a Wall Street billionaire anyway.

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Leslie Eastman posted on

Chad - a great piece. Perhaps your school should consider adding "athletic diversity" to its list of what diversity aspects that need to be nurtured. That you are receiving so many disagreeable comments in this post means you have touched a nerve. Bravo - and keep on standing strong for the values you hold dear.

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Anonymous posted on

It seems that by categorizing all non-varsity students as bookworms who are "most likely working on extra homework and problem sets," you are committing the exact same offense as those you criticize for categorizing athletes as meatheads who are "less than the average student."

In this case neither points are valid.

Just a thought?

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