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“A huge piece of my heart was left in New York City”:: undefined

“A huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.”

[100 words]: We asked how COVID-19 has

impacted students’ lives.

 

Here are 10 students’ responses.

Submissions have been edited for clarity and length.

Click or use your arrow keys to advance.

March 30, 2020

Illustrated by Liz Nichols

Produced by Hong Sen Du and Raeedah Wahid

“A huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.”

[100 words]: We asked how COVID-19 has impacted students’ lives.

 

Here are 10 students’ responses.

Submissions have been edited for clarity and length.

Tap or

swipe

March 30, 2020

Illustrated by Liz Nichols

Produced by Hong Sen Du and Raeedah Wahid

“A huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.”

[100 words]: We asked how COVID-19 has impacted students’ lives.

 

Here are 10 students’ responses.

Submissions have been edited for clarity and length.

March 30, 2020

Tap or

swipe

Illustrated by Liz Nichols

 

Produced by Hong Sen Du

and Raeedah Wahid

I won’t be able to walk across the stage in my blue gown, I won’t be able to say goodbye to my friends, and I won’t be able to thank my professors.

My trip to Paris to visit my French boyfriend has been canceled due to Trump’s travel restrictions.

I can’t go anywhere but home.

I worry about what massive event the virus will disrupt next.

My existence has been commandeered by the coronavirus.

Even without the virus, it seems as if we all now live in a

permanent state of quarantine.

I wonder what is in store for our future.

—Antonia Bentel, BC ’20

I won’t be able to walk across the stage in my blue gown, I won’t be able to say goodbye to my friends, and I won’t be able to thank my professors.

My trip to Paris to visit my French boyfriend has been canceled due to Trump’s travel restrictions.

I can’t go anywhere but home.

I worry about what massive event the virus

will disrupt next.

My existence has been commandeered by the coronavirus.

Even without the virus, it seems as if we all now live in a permanent state of quarantine.

I wonder what is in store for our future.

—Antonia Bentel, BC ’20

I won’t be able to walk across the stage in my blue gown, I won’t be able

to say goodbye

to my friends,

and I won’t be able to

thank my professors.

My trip to Paris to visit my French boyfriend has been canceled due to Trump’s travel restrictions.

I can’t go anywhere but home.

I worry about what massive event the virus will disrupt next.

My existence has been commandeered by the coronavirus.

Even without the virus, it seems as if we all now live in a

permanent state of quarantine.

I wonder what is in store for our future.

—Antonia Bentel, BC ’20

As a graduating senior, I’ll miss the goodbyes that I never got to properly say.

Relationships that I should’ve savored during the final month leading up to graduation became violently compressed into 30-minute goodbyes; steaks that should’ve richly marinated overnight became microwaved under “high” for two minutes instead.

It seems like there will be no finality, no closure for

my senior year—a play without a denouement.

If that reference was too pretentious, let me put it this way: It’s like if “Batman v Superman” (2016) cut to black right before Batman fights Superman.

Will the PawPrint color printer in Butler allow me to render my online PDF diploma on a

medium-weight 11-by-14?

—Albert Tai, SEAS ’20

As a graduating senior, I’ll miss the goodbyes that I never got to properly say.

Relationships that I should’ve savored during the final month leading up to graduation became violently compressed into 30-minute goodbyes; steaks that should’ve richly marinated overnight became microwaved under “high” for two minutes instead.

It seems like there will be no finality, no closure for

my senior year—a play without a denouement.

If that reference was too pretentious, let me put it this way: It’s like if “Batman v Superman” (2016) cut to black right before Batman fights Superman.

Will the PawPrint color printer in Butler allow me to render my online PDF diploma on a medium-weight 11-by-14?

—Albert Tai, SEAS ’20

As a graduating senior, I’ll miss the goodbyes that I never got to properly say.

Relationships that I should’ve savored during the final month leading up to graduation became violently compressed into 30-minute goodbyes; steaks that should’ve richly

marinated overnight became microwaved under “high” for two minutes instead.

It seems like there will be no finality, no closure for my senior year—a play without a denouement.

If that reference was too pretentious, let me put it this way: It’s like if “Batman v Superman” (2016) cut to black right before Batman fights Superman.

Will the PawPrint color printer in Butler allow me to render my online PDF diploma on a medium-weight 11-by-14?

—Albert Tai, SEAS ’20

I am still grappling with the sudden and

almost overnight transition.

My heart is full of confusion,

sadness, and shock, and a huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.

Lately, I’ve felt a desire to connect with as

many of my loved ones and friends as possible.

I catch myself calling and texting multiple people and telling them how much I love and appreciate them, maybe because it hit me that life can unexpectedly change at any moment and we should be grateful for everything we have in life.

—Adele Chi, BC’22

I am still grappling with the sudden and

almost overnight transition.

My heart is full of confusion,

sadness, and shock, and a huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.

Lately, I’ve felt a desire to connect with as

many of my loved ones and friends as possible.

I catch myself calling and texting multiple people and telling them how much I love and appreciate them, maybe because it hit me that life can

unexpectedly change at any moment and we should be grateful for everything we have in life.

—Adele Chi, BC’22

I am still grappling with the sudden and

almost overnight transition.

My heart is full of confusion,

sadness, and shock, and a huge piece of my heart was left in New York City.

Lately, I’ve felt a desire to connect with as

many of my loved ones and friends as possible.

I catch myself calling and texting multiple people and telling them how much I love and appreciate them, maybe because it hit me that life can unexpectedly change at any moment and we should be grateful for everything

we have in life.

—Adele Chi, BC’22

I am a transfer student who left my first school dejected and hopeless.

Barnard welcomed me with open arms and hasn’t let go.

Of course, the transfer

process was not seamless;

I was denied housing for

my three years here.

However, my classes, friends, and student organizations reassured me that I belonged.

I am a transfer student who left my first school dejected and hopeless.

Barnard welcomed me with open arms and hasn’t let go.

Of course, the transfer

process was not seamless;

I was denied housing for

my three years here.

However, my classes, friends, and student organizations reassured me that I belonged.

I am a transfer student who left my first school dejected and hopeless.

Barnard welcomed me with open arms and hasn’t let go.

Of course, the transfer

process was not seamless;

I was denied housing for

my three years here.

However, my classes, friends, and student organizations reassured

me that I belonged.

This year’s senior events—especially Commencement—were proof that no matter where I started, I would finish my college career as an irrevocable part of the Columbia community.

Without the closure these events provide,

I still sometimes feel like an outsider.

—Collier Curran, BC ’20

This year’s senior events—especially Commencement—were proof that no matter where I started, I would finish my college career as an irrevocable part of the Columbia community.

Without the closure these events provide,

I still sometimes feel like an outsider.

—Collier Curran, BC ’20

This year’s senior events—especially Commencement—were proof that no matter where I started, I would finish my college career as an irrevocable part of the Columbia community.

Without the closure these events provide,

I still sometimes feel like an outsider.

—Collier Curran, BC ’20

I looked forward to my morning drive on the Hudson from Westchester while I listened to NPR.

I was truly enjoying all of my courses.

The abrupt transition to online learning is devastating and extremely challenging.

I have ordered noise-canceling headphones and desk dividers for the fold-out table I am using for a desk for me and my son, who will also be learning from home.

I am trying to remain calm and find the silver linings for me, my family, my community, and all those I care about.

I applaud the way Columbia has handled the outbreak.

As for the nation, it is a great disappointment and a reflection of whom we should NOT vote

for in the November election.

—Monica Victoria, GS ’21

I looked forward to my morning drive on the Hudson from Westchester while I listened to NPR.

I was truly enjoying all of my courses.

The abrupt transition to online learning is devastating and extremely challenging.

I have ordered noise-canceling headphones and desk dividers for the fold-out table I am using for a desk for me and my son, who will also be learning from home.

I am trying to remain calm and find the silver linings for me, my family, my community, and all those I care about.

I applaud the way Columbia has handled the outbreak.

As for the nation, it is a great disappointment and a reflection of whom we should NOT vote

for in the November election.

—Monica Victoria, GS ’21

I looked forward to my morning drive on the Hudson from Westchester while I listened to NPR.

I was truly enjoying all of my courses.

The abrupt transition to online learning is devastating and extremely challenging.

I have ordered noise-canceling headphones and desk dividers for the fold-out table I am using for a desk for me and my son, who will also be learning from home.

I am trying to remain calm and find the silver linings for me, my family, my community, and all those I care about.

I applaud the way Columbia has handled the outbreak.

As for the nation, it is a great disappoint- ment and a reflection of whom we should NOT vote for in the November election.

—Monica Victoria, GS ’21

I'm writing this from a room smaller than the smallest Wien single, where I’ll be quarantined for at least the next week in order to protect my family in case I brought the virus back from campus.

I moved out of my parent’s house last summer and gave my old room to my 10-year-old sister, and as I sit between a bookshelf full of Dr. Seuss stories and boxes of my Contemporary

Civilization books in what used to be the nursery of our Long Island abode, I’m wondering now what drove me to want to move out so soon.

Hindsight is 2020.

—Mary Zaradich, SEAS’22

I'm writing this from a room smaller than the smallest Wien single, where I’ll be quarantined for at least the next week in order to protect my family in case I brought the virus back from campus.

I moved out of my parent’s house last summer and gave my old room to my 10-year-old sister, and as I sit between a bookshelf full of Dr. Seuss stories and boxes of my Contemporary

Civilization books in what used to be the

nursery of our Long Island abode, I’m

wondering now what drove me to want to

move out so soon.

Hindsight is 2020.

—Mary Zaradich, SEAS’22

I'm writing this from a room smaller than the smallest Wien single, where I’ll be

quarantined for at least the next week in order to protect my family in case I brought the virus back from campus.

I moved out of my parent’s house last summer and gave my old room to my 10-year-old sister, and as I sit between a bookshelf full of Dr. Seuss stories and boxes of my Contemporary Civilization books in what used to be the nursery of our Long Island abode, I’m wondering now what drove me to want to move out so soon.

Hindsight is 2020.

—Mary Zaradich,

SEAS’22

It feels like I’m in a simulation.

Or purgatory.

The sudden, crushing relief of getting emergency housing approval coupled with the crushing limbo of wondering if I’m going to have to uproot and be moved into a new dorm any day now.

Yeah—I’m playing tug of war in purgatory.

—Kristoff Smith, CC’22

It feels like I’m in a simulation.

Or purgatory.

The sudden, crushing relief of getting emergency housing approval coupled with the crushing limbo of wondering if I’m going to have to uproot and be moved into a new dorm any day now.

Yeah—I’m playing tug of war in purgatory.

—Kristoff Smith, CC’22

It feels like I’m in a simulation.

Or purgatory.

The sudden, crushing relief of getting emergency housing approval coupled with the crushing limbo of wondering if I’m going to have to uproot and be moved into a new dorm any day now.

Yeah—

I’m playing tug of war in purgatory.

—Kristoff Smith, CC’22

When I realized that leaving school was a real possibility, a deeper resolve formed inside my head.

I was going to find you and ask to be friends again.

Days later, I learned that you left through a stupid Instagram story that said something like “Didn’t think it would end this way.”

I left the day after you did.

I said the same thing in the Ruggles stairwell that day we ended for good.

At home, I listened to the tapes you made me and tried to understand how I would probably never see you again.

I just didn't think it would end this way.

—Nora May Margaret McSorley, CC ’20

When I realized that leaving school was a real possibility, a deeper resolve formed inside my head.

I was going to find you and ask to be friends again.

Days later, I learned that you left through a stupid Instagram story that said something like “Didn’t think it would end this way.”

I left the day after you did.

I said the same thing in the Ruggles stairwell that day we ended for good.

At home, I listened to the tapes you made me and tried to understand how I would probably never see you again.

I just didn't think it would end this way.

—Nora May Margaret McSorley, CC ’20

When I realized that leaving school was a real possibility, a deeper resolve formed inside my head.

I was going to find you and ask to be friends again.

Days later, I learned that you left through a stupid Instagram story that said something like “Didn’t think it would end this way.”

I left the day after you did.

I said the same thing in the Ruggles stairwell that day we ended for good.

At home, I listened to the tapes you made me and tried to understand how I would probably never see you again.

I just didn't think it would end this way.

—Nora May

Margaret

McSorley,

CC ’20

With the COVID-19 pandemic,

I fluctuate between anxiety and

calm as I quarantine myself.

Notifications for news stories, Facebook memes, and text messages flood my phone.

My heart goes out to those

affected, those who have lost

their jobs, and those whose

plans have been altered.

But I hope we stay united in this crisis and uplift each other.

—Raisa Alam, CC ’21

With the COVID-19 pandemic,

I fluctuate between anxiety and

calm as I quarantine myself.

Notifications for news stories, Facebook memes, and text messages flood my phone.

My heart goes out to those

affected, those who have lost

their jobs, and those whose

plans have been altered.

But I hope we stay united in this crisis and uplift each other.

—Raisa Alam, CC ’21

With the COVID-19 pandemic,

I fluctuate between anxiety and

calm as I quarantine myself.

Notifications for news stories, Facebook memes, and text messages flood my phone.

My heart goes out to those

affected, those who have lost

their jobs, and those whose

plans have been altered.

But I hope we stay united in this crisis and uplift each other.

—Raisa Alam, CC ’21

Have your own perspective on how the coronavirus outbreak has impacted your experience at Columbia?

To respond to this [100 words], or to submit an op-ed,

contact opinion@columbiaspectator.com

Have your own perspective on how the coronavirus outbreak has impacted your experience at Columbia?

To respond to this [100 words],

or to submit an op-ed,

contact opinion@columbiaspectator.com

Have your own perspective on how the coronavirus outbreak has impacted your experience at Columbia?

To respond to this [100 words],

or to submit an op-ed,

contact opinion@columbiaspectator.com

[100 words] COVID-19 Impact Contributors Student life
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